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Post Publishing Institute #7: I’m Free! Freelancing! (Part 2)

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Hello and welcome to Part 2 of my discussion on Freelance Writing/Editing. Or as I like to call it, FREELANCE WRITING: THE SEQUEL!

Attack-of-the-Sequels

The ONLY appropriate reaction.

Being a freelance writer, and all that it entails, is very busy work. When one isn’t editing someone’s work, or scribing the latest blurb for a fashion magazine, they have to self promote. I would go into more detail, but I touched on these in the previous blog post.

Instead, allow me to fill your mind with some new and exciting information. As you’ve likely guessed this post still has to do with freelancing, so you may be asking:

“But Zach, haven’t we covered this topic already? Surely you’ve beaten us over the head with all there is to know. How much more could you possibly have to share?”

Well fear not fellow writers and readers, for the world of freelancing is more vast than any Greek epic yet to be read.

"Good, good. Let the long windedness flow through you." -Homer

“Good, good. Let the long windedness flow through you.”
-Homer

Yes, it seems like I covered the gamut but did you know there are freelancers that specialize in what they do? In fact many in this line of work make a living through one type of writing/editing. And since the world of book publishing can always use a more help, these people can take jobs that would normally garner an employed editor/marketer’s attention.

Sarcastic Wonka

I certainly will, Gene Wilder.

Scared Wonka

Now while this may seem like total grunt work, it can actually be a lot of fun. Since book publishing has always been a relatively small market (some businesses having as many as 3 employees) with a small time budget (the yearly budget for most publishing companies is usually 1/10th the budget of one Hollywood movie.) they need all the help they can get planning, editing, writing, and even socializing with the author.

As such, here is a list of a freelance writer/editors many specialized jobs. Check them out and see which ones you jive with the most.

((Disclaimer: As a beginner, chances are you’ll end up doing many of these at once. Like I said before, it’s a busy job that doesn’t allow for slacking.))

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Job 1: Editor

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Figured i’d get the most obvious out of the way first. Being an editor means you will edit. Simple as that. However, how you will edit, what you will edit, and when it’s due, are completely up to the whims of your employers.

When taking on these tasks, always ask the basic questions: How much am I editing? What format is this editing under? (typically fiction is done under Chicago Manual of Style, but it never hurts to ask.) When will you need this done? What are you paying me?

Job 2: Coaching, Consulting.

CoachingSolutions1

Another job that’s pretty easy to grasp. Rather than editing, this job means you’ll be working with the author to make the story better. Typically this falls under the workload of Line Editors, since they’re tasked with working out the fundamental ideas within the story.

Keep in mind, this job is highly personable and requires a great amount of tact and empathy. As many of my friends can attest, writers are not machines made to churn out epic novels for others amusement. They have feelings, wants, hopes, and dreams like any other human being. Understanding this, and being adaptable to your author’s needs, while finding the right way to discuss and motivate, is paramount in this line of work.

Job 3: Book Doctoring

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Sometimes an author falls way behind on a deadline. Sometimes the planned publishing process gets muddled or distorted. Sometimes a book needs a massive overhaul, but it’s too much work for even the most skilled editor on staff. So what do you do? You call a book doctor.

This tends to be the most stressful job for a multitude of reasons. First, you can likely expect whatever it is that’s handed to you will be a monstrous affront to all things literature. Second, it will likely be riddled with issues that need fixing, most of which may be so minuscule that only a keen eye can fix. Third, you’re likely not given nearly enough time to fix all these issues (I mean,heck, they needed a book doctor for a reason.)

It’s not a pleasant job, and half the time you won’t be able to make something half as good as you wanted it to be. Yet it does have its merits, and can be the most rewarding for both the gratitude and paycheck you’d receive.

Job 4: Collaborating and Co-Authoring

GearHeadsCollaborating

There are many reasons an editor/writer becomes a co-author to a work. Maybe your works inspired the author in question. Maybe your previous workings are a significant part of the writings. Maybe the author likes you a lot and thinks you should be signed on. Whatever the reason, Co-Authoring and collaborating connects you to the work on multiple levels, and can be a major boon to your publishing cred.

However, what this job makes up for in bragging rights it takes away in time. Anyone who has ever written a book can say that it was a major emotional, physical, and mental investment. Working with a second author can lessen the physical portion, but the emotional and mental investments are doubled to compensate. Plus, with two authors you may end up writing something twice as long, meaning the physical effort is doubled instead of halved. These assignments can also eat into your other projects as well. So proceed with caution when presented with these opportunities.

Job 5: Ghost Writing

ghost writing

I honestly couldn’t have found a better picture to describe this process.

Ghost writing is when an unknown/unannounced author writes the story, but another author’s name is signed onto it. Examples of this include many James Patterson novels, in which his many understudies write his books while he puts his name on them.

Now, before we jump the gun and say “That’s not fair. Who would be dumb enough to do that?” keep in mind the reason ghost writing exists. Often times an author will want to make a point, but feels their name is associated with too many things. Case in point, Mel Brooks wrote and directed The Elephant Man, but kept his name out so no one would mistake the movie for a comedy. In another example, M. Night Shyamalan allowed Will Smith to take credit as director for After Earth’s production so people would think it was a good movie.

In a way this is what ghost writing does: allow the author to make something they wish to write, but not have their name associated with it. Or, alternatively, it allows a new writer to get their start, but under a more famous person’s name so it’ll sell. No matter what happens, the one writing will always be appropriately compensated and, if you do a good enough job, it could mean greater opportunities and connections.

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That concludes the lesson on freelance writing/editing. Hopefully by now you’ll have amassed enough knowledge to get your start in freelance writing.

Remember, it’s a tough business out there, and requires a considerable amount of time and effort. However, if you keep at it, you’ll find a very rewarding career managed by no one other than you, yourself, and thee.

So what do you think? Have any of you done a job such as these? Have any ever needed someone to do any of these jobs? Do they sound like something you’d be interested in doing?

If you have questions, concerns, critiques, or compliments be sure to leave them in the comments below.

Until next time.

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